Latest News Releases

  • 09/27/2012

    Spray paint training and designing next-generation power plants don’t seem, at first glance, to have much to do with one another. But, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory recently partnered with the Iowa Waste Reduction Center at the University of Northern Iowa to improve spray paint training using a virtual engineering software toolkit. The software enhancements have recently won a regional Federal Laboratory Consortium award for applying federal developed technology to industry needs.




     
  • 08/21/2012

    Materials scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Etrema Products, Inc. (EPI), and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division have developed new ways to form a high tech metal alloy which promise new advances in sensing and energy harvesting technologies.




     
  • 08/14/2012

    A team of researchers at the Ames Laboratory has answered a key question concerning the widely-used Fenton reaction – important in wastewater treatment to destroy hazardous organic chemicals and decontaminate bacterial pathogens and in industrial chemical production.   The naturally occurring reaction was first discovered in 1894 by H.J.H. Fenton, a British chemist at Cambridge, and involves hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron.




     
  • 08/09/2012

    Pioneering mass spectrometry methods developed at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Ames Laboratory are helping plant biologists get their first glimpses of never-before-seen plant tissue structures. The new method opens up new realms of study, ones that might have long-ranging implications for biofuels research and crop genetics.




     
  • 08/03/2012

    By blending optical and atomic force microscope technologies, Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have found a way to complete 3-D measurements of single biological molecules with unprecedented accuracy and precision. Existing technologies allow researchers to measure single molecules on the x and y axes of a 2-D plane. The new technology allows researchers to make height measurements (the z axis) down to the nanometer – just a billionth of a meter – without custom optics or special surfaces for the samples.




     
  • 06/25/2012

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory are using specialized techniques to help unravel the mysteries of a new type superconductor. The group was part of an international collaboration that found that magnetism may be helping or even responsible for superconductivity in iron-based superconductors. The results were published in the June 22 issue of Science.




     
  • 06/18/2012

    Mufit Akinc, an Ames Laboratory associate and a faculty member at Iowa State University since 1981, has been named interim dean of the College of Engineering effective July 30. He succeeds Jonathan Wickert, who will assume the role of senior vice president and provost at Iowa State on the same date.

    Akinc is a professor of materials science and engineering and has led the college’s international engagement initiative since 2010. He also holds a courtesy appointment in chemical and biological engineering.




     
  • 06/18/2012

    Iowa State University’s College of Engineering has named Kristen Constant chair of its materials science and engineering program. Her appointment will begin July 1, 2012. She was identified through an internal search to replace Richard LeSar, chair since 2006, who is stepping down to devote more time to his research activities.

    Constant joined the Iowa State faculty in 1992 and was promoted to full professor in 2011. She is also an associate scientist at the Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory.




     
  • 04/23/2012

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have designed a method to evaluate different conductors for use in metamaterial structures, which are engineered to exhibit properties not possible in natural materials. The work was reported this month in Nature Photonics.




     
  • 04/16/2012

    U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the list of 113 regional middle and high school finalists that will compete in the Energy Department’s National Science Bowl Finals in Washington, D.C., at the end of April. Since January, nearly 14,000 students have competed in regional tournaments in which teams of four or five students were tested via a fast-paced Jeopardy-style format on a range of science-related topics including biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, astronomy and math.