You are here

Feature Stories

  • Ames Laboratory Director Alex King and senior metallurgist Iver Anderson were featured guests on the WOI radio program, "The Exchange" on Friday, November 5. The program also included a pre-recorded segment with Mark Smith, CEO of Molycorp Minerals, a U.S. rare-earth producer and technology company.  (Listen to a podcast)

  • A collaboration of experimentalists from the Kavli Institute of Nanosciences at Delft University of Technology and theorists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory made a breakthrough in the area of controlling single quantum spins. The results were published in Science Express on Sept. 9.

    The researchers developed and implemented a special kind of quantum control over a single quantum magnetic moment (spin) of an atomic-sized impurity in diamond. These impurities, called nitrogen-vacancy (or N-V) centers, have attracted much attention due to their unusual magnetic and optical properties. But their fragile quantum states are easily destroyed by even miniscule interactions with the outside world.

  •  

    Ames Laboratory scientists have come up with a new process to prepare neodymium-iron-boron (Nd2Fe14B) permanent magnets that has the potential to enable them to be produced economically here in the United States.

  • The wide-spread use of antibiotics has saved countless lives, but unfortunately, some of the bacteria responsible for common infections have grown resistant to these drugs. PMX Industries, Inc., has developed EPA-approved antimicrobial copper alloys for use in hospitals and public buildings with help from Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center.

  • AMES, Iowa –Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory are part of collaborative team that’s used a brand new instrument at the DOE’s Spallation Neutron Source to probe iron-arsenic compounds, the “hottest” new find in the race to explain and develop superconducting materials. Rob McQueeney, an Ames Laboratory physicist, was part of that team whose findings, published in the Oct. 8 issue of Physical Review Letters, mark the first research produced with the aid of the new tool.

Pages