Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and OLED-based chemical and biological sensors: an overview

TitleOrganic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and OLED-based chemical and biological sensors: an overview
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsShinar J, Shinar R
Journal TitleJournal of Physics D-Applied Physics
Volume41
Pages133001
Date PublishedJul
Type of ArticleProceedings Paper
ISBN Number0022-3727
Accession NumberISI:000256928100008
KeywordsCHARGE-LIMITED CONDUCTION, CURRENT-VOLTAGE CHARACTERISTICS, DETECTED MAGNETIC-RESONANCE, ELECTRON INJECTION, ENHANCED, METHYLOSINUS-TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B, oxygen, PI-CONJUGATED POLYMERS, POLY(PARA-PHENYLENE)-TYPE LADDER-POLYMERS, TRIPLET-TRIPLET ANNIHILATION
Abstract

The basic photophysics, transport properties, state of the art, and challenges in OLED science and technology, and the major developments in structurally integrated OLED-based luminescent chemical and biological sensors are reviewed briefly. The dramatic advances in OLED performance have resulted in devices with projected continuous operating lifetimes of similar to 2 x 10(5) h (similar to 23 yr) at similar to 150 Cdm(-2) ( the typical brightness of a computer monitor or TV). Consequently, commercial products incorporating OLEDs, e. g., cell phones, MP3 players, and, most recently, OLED TVs, are rapidly proliferating. The progress in elucidating the photophysics and transport properties, occurring in tandem with the development of OLEDs, has been no less dramatic. It has resulted in a detailed understanding of the dynamics of trapped and mobile negative and positive polarons ( to which the electrons and holes, respectively, relax upon injection), and of singlet and triplet excitons. It has also yielded a detailed understanding of the spin dynamics of polarons and triplet excitons, which affects their overall dynamics significantly. Despite the aforementioned progress, there are outstanding challenges in OLED science and technology, notably in improving the efficiency of the devices and their stability at high brightness (> 1000 Cdm(-2)). One of the most recent emerging OLED-based technologies is that of structurally integrated photoluminescence-based chemical and biological sensors. This sensor platform, pioneered by the authors, yields uniquely simple and potentially very low-cost sensor ( micro) arrays. The second part of this review describes the recent developments in implementing this platform for gas phase oxygen, dissolved oxygen ( DO), anthrax lethal factor, and hydrazine sensors, and for a DO, glucose, lactate, and ethanol multianalyte sensor.

DOI10.1088/0022-3727/41/13/133001
Alternate JournalJ. Phys. D-Appl. Phys.