East meets Midwest

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A celebratory handshake after Fumio Ueda (left), executive director of NEDO, and Thomas Lograsso (right), interim director of the Ames Laboratory, signed a memorandum of understanding to collaborate on rare-earth scientific efforts and to exchange information and scientists.

 

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Ames Laboratory and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), a Japanese energy and industrial technology R&D organization, signed a memorandum of understanding on Sept. 10 to promote cooperation between the two agencies in rare-earth and critical-materials research.

The memorandum establishes a framework for Ames Laboratory and NEDO to collaborate on rare-earth scientific efforts and to exchange information and scientists.

“I’m very excited about the memorandum of understanding. This MOU will provide the foundation for the Ames Laboratory and NEDO to explore common interests in and share information on rare-earth research and other critical materials. The MOU will help both organizations with the global perspective on these materials,” says Deb Covey, Ames Laboratory’s director of technology transfer and commercialization.

Ames Laboratory and NEDO signed the MOU as part of inaugural events for the Critical Materials Institute, which is led by the Ames Laboratory. The NEDO delegation members were special guests at the CMI opening ceremony and attended the CMI overview presentations.

“I’m very happy to have this MOU event because this MOU will pave the way for reinforcement in the field of critical materials, such as rare earths, in the pivotal bilateral relationship between the United States and Japan,” says Tohru Nakamura, NEDO’s director of electronic, materials technology and nanotechnology department.

~ by Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi

Awards

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Canfield receives APS David Adler Lectureship Award

Paul Canfield, Ames Laboratory scientist, has been selected by the American Physical Society for the 2014 David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics.

The award recognizes outstanding materials physicists who have made noted contributions through their research, review articles and lecturing.

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2014 Acta Materialia Materials and Society Award to Gschneidner

Karl A. Gschneidner Jr., senior metallurgist at the Ames Laboratory, has been named the winner of the 2014 Acta Materialia Materials and Society Award. The award honors scientists who have made a major positive impact on society through materials science.

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Ames Laboratory staff received the following awards during Iowa State University's fall convocation.
Award for Mid-Career Achievement in Research
The award recognizes a faculty member who has demonstrated exemplary research performance or scholarship accomplishments as documented by peers and experts in the field. A $1,500 award is granted.
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Ruslan Prozorov
Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research
The award recognizes a faculty member who has a national or international reputation for contributions in research, and who has influenced the research activities of students. A $1,500 award is granted.
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Mei Hong

Louis Thompson Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award
Established by the late Louis Thompson, emeritus associate dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the award recognizes an outstanding teacher who is dedicated to helping undergraduate students. A $1,500 award is granted.

 

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Alan Russell

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Pat Thiel

Professional and Scientific Research Award
The award recognizes excellence in research in a professional and scientific staff member who has been at Iowa State for at least five years. A $1,500 award is granted.
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Marek Pruski

Contact:                                                                          For Immediate Release
Steve Karsjen, Public Affairs, 515-294-5643

AMES, Iowa – Middle school students from across Iowa will gather in Ames on Feb. 22 to compete for the 2014 Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University Regional Science Bowl championship and the right to represent Iowa at the Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl in Washington DC in April.

The daylong, quiz-bowl style event, now in its 11th year, will feature an expanded field of 24 teams, up from 16 teams in past years. Teams of four middle school students square off in head-to-head competition, answering math and science questions. The top 12 teams will advance to the double-elimination championship round, culminating in the championship match at 4:00 p.m. The event will take place in Ames Laboratory’s TASF and Spedding Hall as well as Gilman and Hach Halls.

“Due to the popularity of the event and a change from a two-day format, we were able to expand the field to 24 teams this year,” said Science Bowl coordinator Steve Karsjen. “In the past, the openings filled immediately and we always had a waiting list of schools wanting to participate, so we are pleased to be able to include more students.”

Schools participating in this year’s event include the following:

  • Adel DeSoto Minburn
  • Ames
  • Benton (Van Horne)
  • Boone
  • Central Lee (Donnellson)
  • Chariton
  • Fort Dodge
  • Home Schools (Walker)
  • Lynnville-Sully
  • Madrid
  • Mediapolis
  • Nishnabotna (Hamburg)
  • Pella Christian
  • Sacred Heart (West Des Moines)
  • South Hamilton (Jewell)
  • Southeast Webster Grand (Burnside)
  • St. Albert (Council Bluffs)
  • Stanton
  • Starmont (Arlington)
  • Stilwell (West Des Moines)
  • Union (Dysart)
  • West Fork (Rockwell)
  • West Hancock (Kanawha)
  • Williamsburg

Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

Form Department(s):

ESHA

Download form:

Effective date: Oct. 2012

Version: 6

Document number: Form 10202.005

See video

To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century-- finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials-- scientists will need new and advanced tools.

The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research.

3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to  move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food.

But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery. By doing so, researchers can find substitutes to critical materials-- ones essential for clean energy technologies but at risk of being in short supply.

(Read More)

Contact:                                                                        For Release: Feb. 13, 2014
Ryan Ott, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 294-3616
Laura Millsaps, Public Affairs, (515) 294-3474

To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century-- finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials-- scientists will need new and advanced tools.

The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research.

3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to  move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food.

But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery. By doing so, researchers can find substitutes to critical materials-- ones essential for clean energy technologies but at risk of being in short supply.

ImageCMI scientists will use the printer instead of traditional casting methods to streamline the process of bulk combinatorial materials research, producing a large variety of alloys in a short amount of time.

 “Metal 3D printers are slowly becoming more commonplace,” said Ryan Ott, principal investigator at the Ames Laboratory and the CMI.  “They can be costly, and are often limited to small-scale additive manufacturing in industry. But for us, this equipment has the potential to become a very powerful research tool. We can rapidly synthesize large libraries of materials. It opens up a lot of new possibilities.”

The CMI printer, a LENS MR-7 manufactured by Optomec of Albuquerque, N.M., uses models from computer-aided design software to build layers of metal alloy on a substrate via metal powders that are melted by a laser. Four chambers supply metal powders to the deposition head that can be programmed to produce a nearly infinite variety of alloy compositions. The printing occurs in an ultra-low oxygen glove box to protect the quality of highly reactive materials. In a recent demonstration run, the printer produced a one-inch long, 0.25-inch diameter rod of stainless steel in 20 seconds.

The process will overcome some of the obstacles of traditional combinatorial materials research.

“The problem is that it’s been typically limited to thin film synthesis. These thin film samples are not always representative of the bulk properties of a material. For example magnetic properties, important to the study of rare earths, are not going to be the same as you get in the bulk material,” explained Ott.

Combined with computational work, experimental techniques, and a partnership with the Stanford Synchrotron Light Source (SSRL) for X-ray characterization, scientists at the CMI will be able to speed the search for alternatives to rare-earth and other critical metals.

“Now we have the potential to screen through a lot of material libraries very quickly, looking for the properties that best suit particular needs,” said Ott.

This research is supported by the Critical Materials Institute, a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory. CMI seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies. DOE’s Energy Innovation Hubs are integrated research centers that bring together scientists and engineers from many different institutions and technical backgrounds to accelerate scientific discovery in areas vital to U.S. energy security.

Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

 

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Form Department(s):

ESHA

Download form:

Effective date: Jan. 2014

Version: 0

Document number: Form 10200.211

Policy Department(s):

Internal Auditor

Download Policy:

Effective date: Jan. 2014

Version number: 2

Document Number: Policy 10300.001

ImageEver wish there was a shortcut for doing something on your cellphone? Or wish you could find an app to help keep track of something? Well check out this new feature each month and we'll share some tips, tricks and apps with you.

This month's tip is an easy undo for iPhone users who accidentally delete a text message. Simply shake your phone and an undo typing menu box pops up. Sorry Android users; your phone doesn't have this feature :-( 

Click HERE for a demonstration.

If you have a favorite tech tip -- desktop, laptop, tablet or cellphone -- or a cool app you'd like to share, let us know and we'll pass it along. Email your tip to insider@ameslab.gov with an explanation and any relevent links and we'll pass it along to your colleagues.

TIAA-CREF Consultant Visiting the Lab

Paige Cook from TIAA-CREF will be visiting the Ames Laboratory February 5th and 6th from 8:45am-4:00pm each day in 111 TASF, Public Affairs Conference Room, for individual retirement counseling.  If you are interested in scheduling an appointment, please call (866) 843-5640.

 

Halogen eAppraisal Training Available for Employees and Supervisors

This year’s annual performance evaluation process will kick off Monday, February 3rd and wrap up Friday, February 28th.  If you would like to learn more about completing the evaluation form and navigating through the HaloRegen eAppraisal system, please sign up for one of the training sessions listed below by calling the Training Office at 294-9972.

  • Employee Session (151 TASF):  Tuesday, February 4th at 10-11am
  • Employee Session (151 TASF):  Wednesday, February 5th at 2-3pm
  • Supervisor Session (151 TASF):  Monday, February 10th at 2-3pm
  • Supervisor Session (151 TASF):  Wednesday, February 12th at 10-11am

Need a Password Reset?

In preparation for the upcoming annual performance evaluation process, should you work off-site or on a low enclave computer and need your VPN password reset, please contact the Information Systems Office now at 294-8348 to ensure you are ready to go on February 3rd.

Conflicts of Interest and Commitment (COIC) Email Coming Soon

Shortly, you will find in your inbox a message asking you to participate in disclosing any conflicts of interest or commitment you may have with the university.  To create or update a disclosure, log into AccessPlus and select COIC Disclosure under the Employee Tab.  For questions about this policy or further assistance, email coi@iastate.edu.