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Chemistry Framework using Common Component Architecture

FWP/Project Description: 

The development of emerging technologies such as molecular computing, nanotechnology, and next generation catalysts will continue to place increasing demands on chemical simulation software, requiring more capabilities and more sophisticated simulation environments.  Such software will be too complex for a single group, or even a single discipline to develop independently.  Coupling multiple physical models in one domain and coupling simulations across multiple time and length-scales will become the norm rather than the exception. These simulations will also run on more complicated and diverse hardware platforms, potentially with hundreds of thousands of processors and performance exceeding one petaFLOP/s.  This evolution will transform the way chemists must think about scientific problems, models and algorithms, software lifecycle and the use of computational resources.  Advances in chemical science critical to DOE and national challenges require adoption of new approaches for large-scale collaborative development and a flexible, community-based architecture. We propose to employ the infrastructure of the Common Component Architecture to develop interfaces among three of the most important computational chemistry codes in the world: General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS), the Massively Parallel Quantum Chemistry program (MPQC) and Northwest Chem (NWChem).

Principal Investigators:
Mark Gordon, Masha Sosonkina, Theresa Windus

Interoperable Software for Modern High-Performance Applications

FWP/Project Description: 

High-performance applications executing on distributed systems achieve only a fraction of the peak aggregate performance of the underlying hardware and middleware.  This is due mainly to the mismatch between the way parallel computation and communication are organized into applications and the optimal way to use the processor, memory, and interconnect hardware.  Different programming models, language primitives, and supporting services are “single-box” systems to distributed systems with nodes located thousands of miles apart.  The purpose of the project is twofold: to achieve transparent tuning of high-performance applications to the communication subsystem while facilitating transition to future programming models, and to augment the newly developed and enhanced programming models with information about the communication environment.

Principal Investigators:
Masha Sosonkina

Kinetic Theory of Multiphase Flow

FWP/Project Description: 

It is proposed to further the present understanding of circulating fluidized beds from the conceptual standpoint of kinetic theory. The primary purpose is to provide a theoretical underpinning for the construction of computer codes to better understand and predict multiphase flow behavior in circulating fluidized beds, and, in particular, to provide theoretical estimates for the transport coefficient analogues that parameterize the computer simulations.

Principal Investigators:
Rodney Fox, Shankar Subramaniam

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