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Ames Laboratory scientists use supercomputers to beat the clock on new magnet discovery

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Ames Laboratory is taking advantage of Titan, one of the world’s most powerful computers, to discover substitutes for rare-earth magnets. In the race to find substitutes, supercomputers are the lead-off runner, ensuring that scientists can rapidly target the best possibilities for materials discovery.

SIDEBAR:
Bruce Harmon goes from sliderules to supercomputers

Ames Laboratory scientists use supercomputers to beat the clock on new magnet discovery

Ames Laboratory is taking advantage of Titan, one of the world’s most powerful computers, to discover substitutes for rare-earth magnets. In the race to find substitutes, supercomputers are the lead-off runner, ensuring that scientists can rapidly target the best possibilities for materials discovery. Titan, located at the DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., uses a combination of traditional central processing units and graphics processing units that were first created for computer gaming.

From slide rule to supercomputer: Scientists have gone from mechanical calculations to petaflops in just decades

In just one generation, scientists have seen an incredible increase in their ability to perform calculations. When Bruce Harmon, senior scientist for the Ames Laboratory, attended Lane Technical High School in Chicago, slide rules were the uniform for scientists and engineers. Now supercomputers are moving towards the goal of processing 1018 calculations per second.

Iowa State, Ames Lab chemists help find binding site of protein that allows plant growth

Iowa State University News Service issued a news release on work by a team ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers that discovered where a protein binds to plant cell walls, a process that makes it possible for plants to grow. Researchers say the discovery could one day lead to bigger harvests of biomass for renewable energy. The findings have just been published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition.

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