Mark your calendars! The 12th annual Ames Laboratory Employee Benefit Holiday Auction will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 10.

Donations of items to be auctioned are needed as soon as possible and may be dropped off at the Public Affairs Office, 111 TASF. Items will be on display throughout the holiday season. Donations of food and hats scarves and mittens will also be collected.

A new activity for this year's auction will be an "Ugly Christmas Sweater" contest. Konnie Willie-Kennicker is spearheading the contest and urges people to check their closets, the Goodwill Store or the Salvation Army for a potential winning garment. Sweater judging will take place during the auction and an as-yet-to-be-determined prize will be awarded to the winner.

Check the November Insider for more details and a listing of auction items.

 

Two Ames Laboratory researchers were among 39 faculty and staff honored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Iowa State University for their accomplishments. The recipients were recognized at the Fall Liberal Arts & Sciences Faculty/Staff Convocation on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013.

ImageAmes Lab physicist Alan I. Goldman, Distinguished Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy received an Excellence in Undergraduate Introductory Teaching which recognizes outstanding performance in teaching undergraduate introductory classes (defined as entry-level courses in the discipline). He taught many semesters of the introductory Physics 111 and 221 courses and received an exceptionally high average student rating of 4.4/5.0. Comments from students attest to his ability to communicate a complex subject in lecture while keeping them engaged through the imaginative use of demonstrations and clickers and leaving time for questions. He views teaching as a valuable opportunity to communicate to his students the beautiful order in the natural world.

 

 

 

 

ImageAmes Lab scientist Mark S. Gordon, Frances M. Craig Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemistry, received an award for Graduate Mentoring. The award recognizes the effectiveness of major professors who serve as mentors and who enrich the student-professor relationship by support and attention to detail which enables students to finish their work in a timely and scholarly manner. Major professors considered for this award are expected to be supportive of their students beyond graduation.

Gordon has graduated 36 Ph.D. students, six M.S. students, and has 13 graduate students in his current group. Many of his former students are employed at prominent research organizations such as the Air Force Research Laboratory and as faculty at top research universities including Purdue University, University of Zurich, and University of Copenhagen. He treats all students as unique individuals, nurtures them according to their interests and strengths, and encourages and develops them into the best possible scientists they aspire to be.

Ames Laboratory cyclists completed the National Bike Challenge with a total of nearly 16,500 miles. Forty-six riders contributed to the total which placed the Lab fourth among the 62 Iowa teams registered for the event and 88th nationally out of 2,144 teams.

Iowa State University finished as the number three workplace in Iowa behind Rockwell-Collins and ACT, Inc., thanks to the strong showing by Ames Lab riders.

The national event, which ran from May 1 to September 30, drew a total of 34,627 riders who logged a total of 19.26 million – yes MILLION – miles. That translates in 7.15 million pounds of CO2 saved. Ames Lab riders saved 10,188 pounds of CO2.

Top rider for Ames Lab was Rebecca Shivvers with more than 2,100 miles. She won a Voltaic Fuse 4W Solar Charger. Gary Walter was close behind in second place and won a $100 gift certificate to Bike World. In third was Kyle Marchuk with 828 miles for which he won a $50 gift certificate to Bike World.

Besides Shivvers, Walter and Marchuk, the following also participated in the Challenge: James William Evans, Valentin Taufour, Keith Woo, Dan Kayser, Steven Constance, Anton Jesche, David Vaknin, Konnie Willie-Kennicker, Chih-Chia Su, Jonna Berry, Margaret Evans, Marilu Dick-Perez, Stacey Althaus, Gaoyuan Ouyang, Jinfang Cui, Vickie Hahn, Karl Gschneidner, Steve Karsjen, Gordie Miller, Ross Anderson, Kerry Gibson, Payton Goodrich, Norma Sandvick, Steven Y., Mark Murphy, Keith Fritzsching, Julia Sager, Andy Meiszberg, Deb Samuelson, Kara Nady, Michael McGuigan, Juan Duchimaza, Katie Sievers, Igor Slowing, Tom Wessels, Paul Berge, Jared Delmar, Brandt Jensen, Alon Klekner, Barbara Lograsso, Sallie Spencer, Andrea Spiker, and Larry Stoltenberg.

To celebrate the conclusion of the Bike Challenge, participants gathered on Oct. 2 for a lunchtime pizza party courtesy of Ames Lab Director Tom Lograsso. Lograsso presented the prizes to the top two bikers.

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Rebecca Shivvers receives her solar charger from Tom Lograsso.
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Gary Walter with his $100 Bike World gift certificate.

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National Bike Challenge participants who gathered for the wrap-up pizza party were, (front row, l-r) Rebecca Shivvers, Jim Evans, Jonna Berry,
Stacey Althaus, Marilu Dick-Perez, Gaoyuan Ouyang, Anton Jesche; (back row, l-r) Steve Karsjen, Dan Kayser, Gary Walter, Alon Klekner,
Valentin Taufour, David Vaknin, Mark Murphy, Steve Constance, Tom Lograsso and Kerry Gibson.

ImageFor those who know him, you expect to see Dave Boeke behind the wheel of a Mopar muscle car. But the Ames Lab senior research technician has turned over a new leaf … and a green leaf at that.

The gas-guzzlin’, shiny black Dodge Challenger – as well as his vintage lime green one and another project car – have been replaced by a Toyota Prius hybrid. And a commercial wind turbine is churning out electrical power on farmland he owns in northern Iowa.

“I got rid of the muscle cars and bought the Prius in April of 2012,” Boeke says. “It’s actually my wife’s car, but I drive it occasionally. I still have my Dodge Ram pickup … everybody needs a truck if not for you then for your friends to borrow … so I’ll hang on to it.”

“I’ve been thinking about getting a second Prius,” he adds. “We got 46 mpg on a longer trip and you actually get better mileage in town than out on the road.”

“His” wind turbine is part of the Pioneer Prairie wind farm that stretches from southern Minnesota into Howard and Mitchell counties in northern Iowa. The wind farm is owned by EDP Renewables, a Houston-based company that leases a portion of the farm northwest of Osage that Boeke inherited from his late father, Richard.

“Dad was interested in the wind farm and went to a lot of meetings they had when it was first proposed,” Boeke says. “There are actually a lot of restrictions about where a turbine can be placed and he felt like it would be good for the environment to generate electricity that way.”

The initial studies looked at prevailing winds 50 meters above the ground which weren’t sufficient. But later studies, taken 80 meters up, showed more than enough wind to spin the turbines.

The senior Boeke signed a contract in September 2008 and the turbine was running in 2009. Dave inherited the land in 2010.

“You can make more by leasing the land than you ever could farming it,” Boeke said.  “They have a 30-year lease and it’s renewable so I expect the turbine to be there for quite some time.”

“There are quite a few people at the Lab driving Priuses and even a couple that have wind turbines,” Boeke says, “but I think I might be the only one that can claim both.”

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Boeke at the base of "his" wind turbine with his Prius in the foreground.

ImagePaul Canfield, scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University, has been selected by the American Physical Society for the 2014 David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics.

The award recognizes outstanding materials physicists who have made noted contributions through their research, review articles and lecturing.

Canfield’s research interests include the design, discovery, growth and characterization of novel electronic and magnetic compounds -- often in single-crystal form -- and the study of their electrical, magnetic and thermal properties. Over the past three decades he has helped discover, understand, and optimize materials with ferromagnetic and superconducting states as well as more exotic systems that have fragile magnetism that can be manipulated so as to shed light on basic questions addressing the very existence of magnetic behavior.

“Paul is an exceptional physicist and a worldwide leader in materials growth and characterization,” said Thomas Lograsso, interim director of Ames Laboratory. “He’s also an enthusiastic communicator and teacher, who, no doubt, has inspired many in the next generation of scientists. Ames Lab is proud to claim Paul as one of our own.”

Canfield received a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Virginia and a doctorate in physics from the University of California at Los Angeles. After postdoctoral work at Los Alamos National Laboratory, he joined the Ames Laboratory in 1993 and the Iowa State University Department of Physics and Astronomy in 1994.

In 2011, Canfield received a DOE Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, which recognizes contributions in research and development supporting DOE. He has also received a DOE Outstanding Scientific Accomplishment Award for Solid State Physics. Canfield is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. In recognition of his research and teaching accomplishments, Canfield has received several awards from Iowa State University, including the ISU Early Excellence in Research Award, Mid-career Achievement Award and Master Teacher Award. He currently holds the ISU Robert Allen Wright Professorship of Physics.

“Of course, it’s always extremely pleasing to see world-class research coming out of the Iowa State University Physics and Astronomy Department. Furthermore, Professor Paul Canfield is also being recognized for his ability to communicate his insights into material science research in review papers and in the classroom,” said Frank Krennrich, professor and chair of ISU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “Paul did a faculty improvement leave two years ago, which enabled him to focus on developing a course on materials research that he taught at Karlsruhe, Madrid and Oxford. Such activities further Iowa State’s reputation in research and education worldwide.”

Canfield is an author of roughly 800 peer reviewed articles and has also written general science reviews of superconductivity in Physics Today, Physics World and Scientific American. He has written essays in Nature Physics about the basic esthetics that drive the research physicist and has compared experimental, new materials research to his other passion, cooking. Over the past decade Canfield has created and taught courses about the fundamentals of new materials discovery and characterization in a number of universities and summer schools. His hope is to inspire and educate as many researchers as possible to join the vital search for new materials that will alleviate humanity’s growing energy and environmental needs.

“When Paul was a visiting scientist and faculty member, he did what we’d never done before: immediately involved our students in real crystal growth experiments,” said Herman Suderow, professor of physics at Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain, “Paul set up a growth lab from scratch and created and presented a course that taught the practical and theoretical aspects of new materials design, characterization and growth. When I saw the excitement on our students’ faces when they first opened an ampoule and saw the beautiful crystals inside, I knew they shared Paul’s excitement for crystal growth. The students had such a great time that when they did a group photo at the end of the year they titled it ‘Canfield’s Year.’ In my view, Paul will be an excellent holder of the Adler Award, and he will encourage others in the much needed combination of teaching and frontier research. I know I keep learning from him, both in teaching and in science.”

“Paul’s an extraordinary physicist and his lively personality is naturally inquisitive and engaging,” said Bruce Harmon, Ames Laboratory scientist and Canfield’s longtime colleague. “Paul uses his passion for science to motivate others, teaching and mentoring a number of students that have gone on to then spread a ‘Canfield love of science” in their roles in research and teaching.”

According to the APS award citation, Canfield was selected because of “his outstanding mentoring and enthusiastic communication of the excitement and importance of materials physics; and for his development and elucidation of superconductivity in magnesium-diboride and iron-pnictide” materials.

APS will present the award to Canfield at its meeting in March 2014, where Canfield will give an invited talk. The award consists of a certificate and honorarium.

mschlosser@ameslab.gov

Melinda Schlosser

Administrative Specialist III
Director's Office
Address

317 Technical and Administrative Services Facility (TASF)

The Ames Laboratory

Ames, IA  50011-3020

Phone
515-294-2770
Fax
515-294-4556
Email
mschlosser@ameslab.gov

Contacts:                                                                 For release: Oct. 22, 2013
Paul Canfield, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, 515-294-6270
Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi, Public Affairs, 515-294-9750

 

ImagePaul Canfield, scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University, has been selected by the American Physical Society for the 2014 David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics.

The award recognizes outstanding materials physicists who have made noted contributions through their research, review articles and lecturing.

Canfield’s research interests include the design, discovery, growth and characterization of novel electronic and magnetic compounds -- often in single-crystal form -- and the study of their electrical, magnetic and thermal properties. Over the past three decades he has helped discover, understand, and optimize materials with ferromagnetic and superconducting states as well as more exotic systems that have fragile magnetism that can be manipulated so as to shed light on basic questions addressing the very existence of magnetic behavior.

“Paul is an exceptional physicist and a worldwide leader in materials growth and characterization,” said Thomas Lograsso, interim director of Ames Laboratory. “He’s also an enthusiastic communicator and teacher, who, no doubt, has inspired many in the next generation of scientists. Ames Lab is proud to claim Paul as one of our own.”

Canfield received a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Virginia and a doctorate in physics from the University of California at Los Angeles. After postdoctoral work at Los Alamos National Laboratory, he joined the Ames Laboratory in 1993 and the Iowa State University Department of Physics and Astronomy in 1994.

In 2011, Canfield received a DOE Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, which recognizes contributions in research and development supporting DOE. He has also received a DOE Outstanding Scientific Accomplishment Award for Solid State Physics. Canfield is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. In recognition of his research and teaching accomplishments, Canfield has received several awards from Iowa State University, including the ISU Early Excellence in Research Award, Mid-career Achievement Award and Master Teacher Award. He currently holds the ISU Robert Allen Wright Professorship of Physics.

“Of course, it’s always extremely pleasing to see world-class research coming out of the Iowa State University Physics and Astronomy Department. Furthermore, Professor Paul Canfield is also being recognized for his ability to communicate his insights into material science research in review papers and in the classroom,” said Frank Krennrich, professor and chair of ISU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “Paul did a faculty improvement leave two years ago, which enabled him to focus on developing a course on materials research that he taught at Karlsruhe, Madrid and Oxford. Such activities further Iowa State’s reputation in research and education worldwide.”

Canfield is an author of roughly 800 peer reviewed articles and has also written general science reviews of superconductivity in Physics Today, Physics World and Scientific American. He has written essays in Nature Physics about the basic esthetics that drive the research physicist and has compared experimental, new materials research to his other passion, cooking. Over the past decade Canfield has created and taught courses about the fundamentals of new materials discovery and characterization in a number of universities and summer schools. His hope is to inspire and educate as many researchers as possible to join the vital search for new materials that will alleviate humanity’s growing energy and environmental needs.

“When Paul was a visiting scientist and faculty member, he did what we’d never done before: immediately involved our students in real crystal growth experiments,” said Herman Suderow, professor of physics at Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain, “Paul set up a growth lab from scratch and created and presented a course that taught the practical and theoretical aspects of new materials design, characterization and growth. When I saw the excitement on our students’ faces when they first opened an ampoule and saw the beautiful crystals inside, I knew they shared Paul’s excitement for crystal growth. The students had such a great time that when they did a group photo at the end of the year they titled it ‘Canfield’s Year.’ In my view, Paul will be an excellent holder of the Adler Award, and he will encourage others in the much needed combination of teaching and frontier research. I know I keep learning from him, both in teaching and in science.”

“Paul’s an extraordinary physicist and his lively personality is naturally inquisitive and engaging,” said Bruce Harmon, Ames Laboratory scientist and Canfield’s longtime colleague. “Paul uses his passion for science to motivate others, teaching and mentoring a number of students that have gone on to then spread a ‘Canfield love of science” in their roles in research and teaching.”

According to the APS award citation, Canfield was selected because of “his outstanding mentoring and enthusiastic communication of the excitement and importance of materials physics; and for his development and elucidation of superconductivity in magnesium-diboride and iron-pnictide” materials.

APS will present the award to Canfield at its meeting in March 2014, where Canfield will give an invited talk. The award consists of a certificate and honorarium.

Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

Form Department(s):

ESHA

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Effective date: Jan. 2013

Version: 4

Document number: Form 10200.095

Understanding the Social Network of Plants

Recent estimates state that the supply of food should increase by 50% in the next 40 years to accommodate the changes in demographics and eating habits. We are at a remarkable juncture where (i) the price of oil and nitrogen-based fertilizers is expected to increase, (ii) the long term availability of phosphorus for fertilizers is in doubt, (iii) the erosion of soil is reducing yields, and (iv) climate change brings extreme weather that impacts crop survival and productivity.

Polymer-like Nanowires

Unique properties (e.g., rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, folding, reptation) determine the utility of polymer molecules and derive from their morphology (i.e., one-dimensional connectivity and large aspect ratios) and flexibility. Crystals do not display similar properties because they have smaller aspect ratios, they are rigid, and they are often too large and heavy to be colloidally stable. These limitations are not fundamental and they can be overcome by growth processes that mimic polymerization.