Purdue University issued a news release detailing Purdue's involvement in the Critical Materials Institute, one of the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Innovation Hubs, located and led by the DOE's Ames Laboratory.

IDPH Letter # 4 - Feb. 26, 2002

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Feb. 2002
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IDPH Letter # 3 - Sep. 17, 2001

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Sep. 2001
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NA
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IDPH Letter # 2 - Oct. 15, 1998

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Oct. 1998
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NA
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IDPH Letter # 1 - Jan. 11, 1996

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Jan. 1996
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Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors

Highlight Date: 
11/17/2013
Display Section: 
Broad Audience Highlights
Article Title: 
Magnonlike Dispersion of Spin Resonance in Ni-doped BaFe<sub>2</sub>As<sub>2</sub>
Author(s): 
M. G. Kim, G. S. Tucker, D. K. Pratt, S. Ran, A. Thaler, A. D. Christianson, K. Marty, S. Calder, A. Podlesnyak, S. L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, A. Kreyssig, A. I. Goldman, and R. J. McQueeney
Article Link: 
Journal Name: 
Physical Review Letters
Volume: 
110
Year: 
2013
Page Number(s): 
177002
Highlight Text: 

The propagation of a novel magnetic excitation in the superconducting state, called a spin resonance, has been observed in iron arsenide superconductorsfor the first time. How the resonance disperses depends upon the direction probed within the single crystals studied. Propagation of the spin resonance reveals details about the superconducting state and highlights qualitative differences between iron arsenide and cuprate superconducting materials.  The magnetic excitation appears in the superconducting state with upwards dispersion in iron arsenide superconductors. By contrast, in cuprate superconductors the dispersion is downwards. The neutron scattering measurements designed to study the spin resonance were performed on a single crystal of a nickel-doped barium–iron–arsenide superconductor [Ba(Fe0.963Ni0.037)2As2] at the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, U.S. Department of Energy user facilities.  Neutron spin resonance is considered to be a hallmark of unconventional superconductivity, thus a detailed understanding is important to future developments of superconducting materials. 

boersma@ameslab.gov

Stephanie Boersma

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sievers@ameslab.gov

Katie Sievers

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AMES, Iowa – Nik Karpinsky quickly tapped out a few computer commands until Zeus, in all his bearded and statuesque glory, appeared in the middle of a holographic glass panel mounted to an office desk.

The white statue stared back at Karpinsky. Then a hand appeared and turned the full-size head to the right and to the left. Yes, it was quite clear, Zeus really was pictured in 3-D.

And there it was from one computer work station on the second floor of Iowa State University’s Howe Hall to another down on the first floor: 3-D teleconferencing that’s live, real-time and streaming at 30 frames per second.

“Four years ago, this would not have been possible,” said Karpinsky, an Iowa State doctoral student in human computer interaction who’s been working day and night to make the technology a reality.

To read more, go to the Iowa State University News Release.

BCS Theory of Superconductivity Explains Universal Behavior

Highlight Date: 
11/11/2013
Display Section: 
Broad Audience Highlights
Article Title: 
Homes Scaling and BCS
Author(s): 
V. G. Kogan
Article Link: 
Journal Name: 
Physical Review B
Volume: 
87
Year: 
2013
Page Number(s): 
220507
Highlight Text: 

A recent discovery suggested to be a universal behavior of superconductors does not require a fancy new explanation; it elegantly falls out from the BCS theory of superconductivity, first published in 1957.The universal behavior is scaling relationship, known as Homes scaling, that relates the penetration depth of the magnetic field to the superconducting transition temperature and conductivity.  It is valid over many orders of magnitude from the so-called “dirty”, short mean-free path, superconductors up to as clean materials as one can synthesize. Thus, Homes scaling can be considered another confirmation of BCS theory, if any is still needed.