Restoration Sites

During the 1940s, Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory conducted scientific research in support of the nation’s historic Manhattan Project, contributing to the effort to purify uranium for the first self-sustaining chain reaction at the University of Chicago. This effort, as well as scientific research at the Ames Laboratory in the 1950s, resulted in several sites around Ames becoming contaminated by radioactive and hazardous wastes.

Carbon Layers Lead the Way towards a New Generation of Metamaterials

Highlight Date: 
11/21/2013
Display Section: 
Broad Audience Highlights
Article Title: 
Graphene for Terahertz Applications
Author(s): 
P. Tassin, T. Koschny and C. M. Soukoulis
Article Link: 
Journal Name: 
Science
Volume: 
341
Year: 
2013
Page Number(s): 
620-621
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Graphene — a one layer thick sheet of carbon atoms — has special properties that make it a desirable material for manipulating terahertz waves.Terahertz applications operate at frequencies between microwave and far infrared. Some metamaterials, which are engineered structures that can manipulate light in ways not seen in conventional materials, could benefit by replacing the metals currently used to build them with graphene.  Indeed, graphene provides a number of advantages over metals including that its properties offer the unprecedented ability to tune the electrical response for a given application.  Graphene also offers the advantage of a potential enhancement of terahertz wave confinement.  Experimental data have shown significantly higher electrical losses than has been estimated by theoretical work, showing there is more research that needs to be done to make metamaterial devices from graphene.

Hydrogen Flashback Arrestor

Department: 
Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Purdue University issued a news release detailing Purdue's involvement in the Critical Materials Institute, one of the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Innovation Hubs, located and led by the DOE's Ames Laboratory.

IDPH Letter # 4 - Feb. 26, 2002

Department: 
Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Effective Date: 
Feb. 2002
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IDPH Letter # 3 - Sep. 17, 2001

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Sep. 2001
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NA
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IDPH Letter # 2 - Oct. 15, 1998

Department: 
Environment Safety Health Assurance
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Effective Date: 
Oct. 1998
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NA
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IDPH Letter # 1 - Jan. 11, 1996

Department: 
Environment Safety Health Assurance
Document Upload: 
Effective Date: 
Jan. 1996
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NA
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NA

Neutron Spin Resonance in Iron-based Superconductors

Highlight Date: 
11/17/2013
Display Section: 
Broad Audience Highlights
Article Title: 
Magnonlike Dispersion of Spin Resonance in Ni-doped BaFe<sub>2</sub>As<sub>2</sub>
Author(s): 
M. G. Kim, G. S. Tucker, D. K. Pratt, S. Ran, A. Thaler, A. D. Christianson, K. Marty, S. Calder, A. Podlesnyak, S. L. Bud’ko, P. C. Canfield, A. Kreyssig, A. I. Goldman, and R. J. McQueeney
Article Link: 
Journal Name: 
Physical Review Letters
Volume: 
110
Year: 
2013
Page Number(s): 
177002
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The propagation of a novel magnetic excitation in the superconducting state, called a spin resonance, has been observed in iron arsenide superconductorsfor the first time. How the resonance disperses depends upon the direction probed within the single crystals studied. Propagation of the spin resonance reveals details about the superconducting state and highlights qualitative differences between iron arsenide and cuprate superconducting materials.  The magnetic excitation appears in the superconducting state with upwards dispersion in iron arsenide superconductors. By contrast, in cuprate superconductors the dispersion is downwards. The neutron scattering measurements designed to study the spin resonance were performed on a single crystal of a nickel-doped barium–iron–arsenide superconductor [Ba(Fe0.963Ni0.037)2As2] at the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, U.S. Department of Energy user facilities.  Neutron spin resonance is considered to be a hallmark of unconventional superconductivity, thus a detailed understanding is important to future developments of superconducting materials. 

boersma@ameslab.gov

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