A group of students from Southeast Webster-Grand community school toured Ames Lab and made stops on the Iowa State University campus as well on November 21. Talented and Gifted Educator/Coordinator Hazel Purtell brought the group to campus to learn more about careers in science and technology.

At Ames Lab, the group heard a presentation by assistant scientist Brandt Jensen about materials science in general and about the magnetic research in which Jensen is involved.

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Students and teacher Hazel Purtell look at a research notebook detailing
Brandt Jensen's magnetic research at Ames Lab.

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Jensen explains a micrograph showing magnetic domains in a material.

ImageAmes Laboratory/ISU Science Bowl is still seeking volunteers for the 2014 High School Science Bowl on Saturday, Jan. 25 and the 2014 Middle School Science Bowl on Saturday, Feb. 22.  Volunteers serve as moderators, judges, timekeepers and scorekeepers for the exciting science and math game-show style competitions.  Morning or afternoon shifts range from four to eight hours. All volunteers get a free T-shirt and free lunch.

To learn more about Ames Lab/ISU Science Bowl visit: 

http://www.ameslab.gov/education/science-bowl

To sign up to volunteer for one or both Science Bowl events, contact Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi, Public Affairs, breehan@ameslab.gov, 515-294-9750, by Friday, Dec. 20.

ImageAmes Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson has been selected to receive the 2014 Application to Practice Award from TMS, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.

This award is presented to an individual who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in transferring research results or findings in some aspect of the fields of metallurgy and materials into commercial production and practical use as a representative of an industrial, academic, governmental or technical organization.

Anderson was nominated for the award by Paul Prichard, a staff engineer at Kennametal, a Pennsylvania-based manufacturer of metalworking and mining equipment. His selection was approved by the TMS Honors and Professional Recognition Committee and the TMS Board of Directors.

Formal presentation of the award will be made at the TMS-AIME Annual Awards Ceremony & Dinner on Tuesday, February 18, in San Diego, Calif. during the 143rd TMS Annual Meeting.

While the Ames Laboratory Holiday Auction has been benefitting local charities for a dozen years, we've rarely gotten a glimpse of just how the money has been spent to improve the lives of those in need. Last year's beneficiary -- Raising Readers in Story County -- provided the following narrative to illustrate how the gift has been shared and to offer additional thanks for the support.

Ames Laboratory employees made a generous donation last winter to Raising Readers in Story County. This gift will impact 1,000 Story County children, ages 0-11. The Raising Readers Gift Book Program is preparing to distribute science-related books to children who have few books at home.

Each gift book will have a label on the back cover recognizing the Ames Laboratory employees. Selected books will also list tips for parents on how to make science hands-on and fun for their young children.

“We are so pleased that the employees of the Ames Lab are committed to promoting literacy and science in Story County,” said Carol Elbert, Raising Readers Board President.

“It’s never too early to read to a baby,” Raising Readers assures parents. A newborn already can recognize the mother’s voice over the voices of strangers. As a parent cuddles and talks to an infant, the baby is learning. Gradually, children learn about the world around them, develop understanding of language, and experience cause and effect. Reading books is one way to stimulate a child’s curiosity, encourage observation skills, and build vocabulary.

For example, “Splash” in the Baby Faces series by Roberta Grobel Intrater is a board book with color photos of multiethnic babies playing with water. A young baby loves to look at pictures of babies, and a parent can talk about the book, relating the pictures to his child’s own splashing at bathtime.

“Raindrop, Plop!” by Wendy Cheyette Lewison can help a toddler learn about weather and about observing nature. Older children—and adults-- will enjoy the amazing photographs in “A Drop of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder” by Walter Wick and can follow up with their own scientific investigations.

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Carol Elbert

In spring 2014, Raising Readers will provide a free early science and literacy event for Story County families with children ages 0-5. The first 350 children who attend will receive a science-related book purchased by the Ames Lab employee donation.

In addition, Ames Lab gift books will be given to children through Story County food pantries, Youth and Shelter Services Stork’s Nest, United Way in Story County Backpack program, Head Start, and WIC check-ups.

AL-232Bridge to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS)

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Restoration Sites

During the 1940s, Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory conducted scientific research in support of the nation’s historic Manhattan Project, contributing to the effort to purify uranium for the first self-sustaining chain reaction at the University of Chicago. This effort, as well as scientific research at the Ames Laboratory in the 1950s, resulted in several sites around Ames becoming contaminated by radioactive and hazardous wastes.

Carbon Layers Lead the Way towards a New Generation of Metamaterials

Highlight Date: 
11/21/2013
Display Section: 
Broad Audience Highlights
Article Title: 
Graphene for Terahertz Applications
Author(s): 
P. Tassin, T. Koschny and C. M. Soukoulis
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Journal Name: 
Science
Volume: 
341
Year: 
2013
Page Number(s): 
620-621
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Graphene — a one layer thick sheet of carbon atoms — has special properties that make it a desirable material for manipulating terahertz waves.Terahertz applications operate at frequencies between microwave and far infrared. Some metamaterials, which are engineered structures that can manipulate light in ways not seen in conventional materials, could benefit by replacing the metals currently used to build them with graphene.  Indeed, graphene provides a number of advantages over metals including that its properties offer the unprecedented ability to tune the electrical response for a given application.  Graphene also offers the advantage of a potential enhancement of terahertz wave confinement.  Experimental data have shown significantly higher electrical losses than has been estimated by theoretical work, showing there is more research that needs to be done to make metamaterial devices from graphene.

Hydrogen Flashback Arrestor

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Purdue University issued a news release detailing Purdue's involvement in the Critical Materials Institute, one of the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Innovation Hubs, located and led by the DOE's Ames Laboratory.

IDPH Letter # 4 - Feb. 26, 2002

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Environment Safety Health Assurance
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