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Latest News Releases

  • 04/08/2014

    Costas Soukoulis, senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University and associated member of IESL-FORTH in Greece, has won the 2014 Max Born Award from the Optical Society of America. The award honors a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the scientific field of physical optics.

  • 04/04/2014

    Two participants in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) research program at the DOE's Ames Laboratory have been awarded prestigious scholarships, one from the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program and the other from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship program.

  • 03/27/2014

    Nanoparticles assembled in new ways hold the promise of a wave of new high-tech materials that could offer high strength, enhanced magnetic properties, light reflectivity or absorption, use as catalysts and much more. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a theoretical model to explore the effect of polymer coatings, including DNA, for self-assembly of nanocubes into so-called superlattices.

  • 02/28/2014

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are revealing the mysteries of new materials using ultra-fast laser spectroscopy, similar to high-speed photography where many quick images reveal subtle movements and changes inside the materials. Seeing these dynamics is one emerging strategy to better understanding how new materials work, so that we can use them to enable new energy technologies.

  • 02/26/2014

    Testifying as a witness to the Standing Committee on Natural Resources of the Canadian House of Commons,  Alex King, director of the Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy research hub at the Ames Laboratory, said that rare-earth metals and other materials critical to existing and emerging technologies are facing global shortages now and in the future.

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