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  • 11/09/2017

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has discovered and described the existence of a unique disordered electron spin state in a metal that may provide a unique pathway to finding and studying frustrated magnets.

    Condensed matter physicists use the term “frustrated” to describe a kind of magnet in which the spins fail to align into stable magnetic order. In perfectly frustrated magnets called spin liquids, the disordered magnetism of these materials persists even at very low temperatures, and their unique properties are of interest in the development of quantum computing

  • 10/31/2017

    Contacts:                                                                                                                                   For release: Oct. 31, 2017

  • 10/23/2017

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has discovered extreme “bounce,” or super-elastic shape-memory properties in a material that could be applied for use as an actuator in the harshest of conditions, such as outer space, and might be the first in a whole new class of shape memory materials.

  • 10/12/2017

    ​The U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has received $392,000 in funding to commercialize a gas atomization nozzle design used to produce metal powders for manufacturing. In addition, the Laboratory will contribute in-kind matching funds of equal value for the project from private sector partner Ampal, Inc., a part of the United States Metal Powders group of companies.

  • 10/03/2017

    To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose.  Currently, that process requires an acid plus high heat, or pyrolysis -- treating with high heat in the absence of oxygen. Besides being energy-consuming processing methods, the results are less than optimal. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components. 

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