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Feature Stories

  • Seven Ames Laboratory scientists have been recognized for their outstanding scientific achievement and service to professional organizations. (01/16/14)

  • Cutting-edge scientific analysis at the U. S. Department of Energy is not only speeding technological innovation, it’s helping keep the nation safe. Here at the Ames Laboratory, it means bringing our international reputation for advanced tools and techniques in materials characterization to the forensic field of questioned documents investigation.

  • Karl Gschneidner Jr., Ames Laboratory's own "Mr. Rare Earths," did an interactive teleconference with materials science and engineering students at the MRS Fall conference on Dec. 2, 2013. Gschneidner participated in the “Exploration of the Impact of Materials on Society†event, which included a short talk on rare earths and their importance to society, an educational activity, and a question and answer session.

  • Ames Laboratory is taking advantage of Titan, one of the world’s most powerful computers, to discover substitutes for rare-earth magnets. In the race to find substitutes, supercomputers are the lead-off runner, ensuring that scientists can rapidly target the best possibilities for materials discovery. Titan, located at the DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., uses a combination of traditional central processing units and graphics processing units that were first created for computer gaming.

  • Ames Laboratory's founding director, Frank Spedding was one of several Iowa inventors featured on Iowa Public Radio's Sept. 24  River to River program. Host Ben Keiffer talked about a number of Iowa inventors, including John Atanasoff and Clifford Berry, Inventors of the first digital computer, the "ABC computer;" George Gallup, creator of the Gallup poll; and Otto Frederick Rohwedder, inventor of the sliced bread machine.

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