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Safety Spotlight
Soaking up a potential slip

Cathy Long, custodian, is September’s Safety Hero for identifying a slip hazard.

  • STOP: Long noticed water on the floor in Spedding hall, which could make the floor slippery.
  • THINK: Concerned about a slip hazard, Long contacted ESH&A to help investigate the source of the moisture on the floor.
  • CHECK: The source of the moisture was found to be from ice melting off liquid nitrogen dewars used in the DNP-NMR lab. Water leaked into the hallway when a container designed to collect the melted ice overflowed.


Ames Lab hosts National Lab and DOE meetings
The last week of October, Ames Laboratory played host, for the first time, to a series of national laboratory and Department of Energy meetings. The National Laboratory Chief Operating Officers (NLCOO) from the 17 national laboratories met here along with similar groups from the DOE's site offices.


Safety Day puts focus on employee safety
On Oct. 22, Ames Laboratory held a day-long Operation Safety event, putting a focus on raising employee safety awareness. The event, which drew 140 employees, included a keynote presentation on Human Safety Performance by former Ames Laboratory safety manager Jim Withers who now serves in a similar capacity at Danfoss. There was also a series of  rotating morning workshops on Fire Safety, First Aid, Emergency Procedures and Identifying Suspicious Behaviors with the afternoon devoted to  independent safety assessments and corrections, and housekeeping.


After-school scientist
On any given day at Ames High School, you could easily find senior Francesca Spencer involved in All-State Choir or madrigal practice or practice for the December musical, but once the final school bell rings, Spencer’s music takes a backseat to her after-school job working as an investigator-of-sorts in David Baldwin’s office at Ames Laboratory.


Not shaken, not stirred: New molecular modeling techniques for catalysis in unmixed systems
Ames Laboratory scientists have developed molecular modeling simulations and new theoretical formulations to help understand and optimize catalytic reactions that take place in chemical environments where the reactant “ingredients” for catalysis are not well mixed.


Circuitous journey brings Strasburg full circle
In his 17 years at Ames Laboratory, Chris Strasburg has gone from undergad intern, to systems support specialist, to Ph.D. candidate and researcher, to computer protection program manager. Strasburg sat down recently to reflect on his career journey.


Hot air and awards dominate Insider pages
The Insider from October 1990 featured a story on Ames Lab employee Lowell Mathison who was part of the support crew for an Iowa State/Cy decorated hot air balloon.   The issue also contained a story on an R&D 100 award for the Ames Thermite Process and awards for Karl Gschneidner and Ed Yeung.


Portraits project gives new meaning to scientific modeling

Usually when we talk about scientific modeling around the Ames Laboratory, we’re talking about the science: using visual, mathematical, or operational methods to better understand the chemical and physical properties of our world. But this spring  professional photographer Shauna Stephenson invited our scientists to model in an entirely different sense, for the camera.

The resulting fifteen portraits were unveiled at a reception held at Ames Laboratory on Oct. 14, 2015. Read more to see some photos from the unveiling reception and you can see all the images by clicking on the booklet cover at right.



Talking money with your teenager
If you are the parent of teenagers, it might be tough to have a sustained conversation with them about anything, let alone talking about a weighty topic like money. Still, they’ll benefit from some sit-down conversations about saving and spending. Teenagers face growing expenses, more autonomy, and a wider range of options, and they need to understand that handling money intelligently is a part of growing up.


October 2015