Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis by a sonicate immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering

TitleDetection of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis by a sonicate immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsYakes BJ, Lipert RJ, Bannantine JP, Porter MD
Journal TitleClinical and Vaccine Immunology
Volume15
Pages227-234
Date PublishedFeb
Type of ArticleArticle
ISBN Number1556-6811
Accession NumberISI:000258666600008
KeywordsBOVINE-PARATUBERCULOSIS, DETECTION, DIAGNOSIS, FECAL CULTURE, immunogold labels, INFECTION, JOHNES-DISEASE, MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES, nanoparticles, PARA-TUBERCULOSIS, RAPID
Abstract

A sandwich immunoassay for the rapid, low-level detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis has been developed. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and one of the major obstacles in controlling the spread of this disease is the inability to rapidly detect small amounts of bacteria or other diagnostic markers shed during the subclinical stage of infection. This paper details the development and performance of an assay for sonicated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis lysate that is based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). There are two key components of the assay: (i) an immobilized layer of monoclonal antibodies that target a surface protein on the microorganism; and (ii) extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) that are designed to selectively bind to captured proteins and produce large SERS signals. By correlating the number of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacilli present prior to sonication to the amount of total protein in the resulting sonicate, the detection limit determined for total protein can be translated to the microorganism concentration. These findings yield detection limits of 100 and 200 ng/ml ( estimated to be 500 and 1,000 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacilli/ml) for sonicate spiked in phosphate buffer and sonicate spiked in whole milk, respectively. Moreover, the time required to complete the assay, which includes sample preparation, antigen extraction, ERL incubation, and readout, is less than 24 h. The potential for incorporation of this novel assay into diagnostic laboratories is also briefly discussed.

DOI10.1128/cvi.00334-07
Alternate JournalClin. Vaccine Immunol.